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17 Insanely Easy Baking Recipes You Can’t Screw Up

17 Insanely Easy Baking Recipes You Can’t Screw Up

If you’re like me, then you struggle with buying a whole bag of flour, or sugar, or really any bag of baking supplies because you don’t know how you would use the leftovers. With that being said, I did figure out how to make some pretty good flourless banana muffins (recipe coming soon) and became an expert at making fried eggs and oatmeal.

Sometimes cooking the same thing every week becomes boring and too routine. It doesn’t matter if you’re an expert baker, boxed mix fanatic or someone who has never touched a whisk before – you can bake. Here a collection of fail-proof baking recipes that you should definitely try out.

5- Minute Banana Pancake in a Mug

A simple recipe for those mornings when you want to go to IHOP but can’t get out of bed.

Almond Joy Rice Krispies

The easiest way to take plain ol’ Rice Krispies to the adult level.

2-Ingredient Coconut Macaroons

When you feel like becoming an elite baker with only two ingredients.

5- Minute Apple Crumble

Too good to only be eaten in the fall. Recipe here.

5-Minute Oreo Mug Cake

Sometimes we need a little more than just a glass of milk and Oreos. Make it like this.

3- Ingredient Oreo Fudge

You can pretend you’re Willy Wonka with this Oreo-packed fudge.

4- Minute French Toast in a Mug

One mug, no mess, tons of flavor.

3- Ingredient Chocolate Frosted Pumpkin Cookies

The best way to use store-bought cookie dough is to transform it into something even better.

Blackberry Crumble Muffins

Make plain muffins, or add your favorite berries to the mix for a warm, fruity muffin.

5-Minute Pumpin spice Donuts

Now you can make and eat donuts within 10 minutes, without the guilt.

Apricot Challah Cresent Rolls

For when you don’t feel like just making regular Crescent Rolls.

Baked Apple Cider Donut Bites

Trust me, these bites aren’t just for fall.

3-Ingredient Nutella Brownies

This is a recipe to add to your Nutella Pinterest board.

Guilt Free Chocolate Mousse

Skip the avocado mousse and try this ricotta version.

No-Bake Sea Salt Cookie Bark

This recipe will definitely make you feel like a real chocolatier.

Pull-Apart Pumpkin Pie Cookie Butter Bread

For the times when you can’t just eat another spoonful of cookie butter straight from the jar.

Teddy Graham S'mores

Because sometimes we need to satisfy our campfire cravings dorm room style.

This article was originally published by Hannah Cooper, Spoon University


8 Big-Pan Desserts for Your Big, Hungry Crowd

Liz Gutman and Jen King, proprietors of the Brooklyn sweet shop Liddabit Sweets and authors of The Liddabit Sweets Candy Cookbook, say the active work time to make the filling for these squares—made of chocolate, Nutella and cereal flakes—is about three minutes. That makes them the perfect eleventh-hour lifeline for when you remember you need a dessert for tomorrow's potluck. Bonus: The recipe makes about 100 one-inch squares.

These decadent layered bars consist of a base made from oats, coconut and cashews a filling of softened, lemon-scented apricots and a topping of more coconuts and cashews. A final drizzle of caramel pretty much ensures these will be one of the first desserts on the buffet table to go.

Nothing delivers that signature whoosh of coolness like a chocolate-mint confection, and these meltaways have it in spades. Peppermint oil, which you can find in health food stores as a dietary supplement, or peppermint extract will both do the job. This easy recipe from Gutman and King gives you 65 one-inch squares.

Gutman and King say it's worth it to splurge on high-quality butter for this Heath bar–esque creation, since the dessert's center solely consists of butter, sugar and salt (the chopped walnuts and milk chocolate on the outside are just gravy). The recipe makes about 4 pounds, which is enough for 60 people.

While everyone has their preferred brownie (cakey, chewy, fudgy), this classic-with-a-twist recipe from baking guru Alice Medrich will find plenty of fans at a potluck. Medrich stirs nutty brown butter into the chocolate-walnut batter for deeper flavor. You'll wind up with 25 soft, velvety squares with slightly crusty tops.

Economical, super simple to make, impressive to look at and not to mention delicious, this chocolaty matzo-based confection will "magically disappear before your eyes," Gutman and King say. You can use any kind of matzo (salted or not) or even saltines, and can add toppings such as coconut, slivered almonds or chopped dried cherries.

Two characteristics distinguish a truly excellent lemon bar: a base layer that doesn't get soggy, and a filling that gives a little but is still quite firm. This foolproof recipe from entertaining and baking expert Amy Atlas hits both notes. To get razor-sharp cuts through the curd and crust, Atlas says, use a very sharp knife dipped in warm water. Rewet it every few cuts to maintain ultraprecise edges.

We predict that within approximately 23 seconds of placing a platter of sweet, rich homemade fudge in front of your guests, you'll start to hear it around the room: "There's homemade fudge?" and "She made homemade fudge?" This ginger-flecked version—which yields an impressive 64 pieces—will not disappoint the masses.


8 Big-Pan Desserts for Your Big, Hungry Crowd

Liz Gutman and Jen King, proprietors of the Brooklyn sweet shop Liddabit Sweets and authors of The Liddabit Sweets Candy Cookbook, say the active work time to make the filling for these squares—made of chocolate, Nutella and cereal flakes—is about three minutes. That makes them the perfect eleventh-hour lifeline for when you remember you need a dessert for tomorrow's potluck. Bonus: The recipe makes about 100 one-inch squares.

These decadent layered bars consist of a base made from oats, coconut and cashews a filling of softened, lemon-scented apricots and a topping of more coconuts and cashews. A final drizzle of caramel pretty much ensures these will be one of the first desserts on the buffet table to go.

Nothing delivers that signature whoosh of coolness like a chocolate-mint confection, and these meltaways have it in spades. Peppermint oil, which you can find in health food stores as a dietary supplement, or peppermint extract will both do the job. This easy recipe from Gutman and King gives you 65 one-inch squares.

Gutman and King say it's worth it to splurge on high-quality butter for this Heath bar–esque creation, since the dessert's center solely consists of butter, sugar and salt (the chopped walnuts and milk chocolate on the outside are just gravy). The recipe makes about 4 pounds, which is enough for 60 people.

While everyone has their preferred brownie (cakey, chewy, fudgy), this classic-with-a-twist recipe from baking guru Alice Medrich will find plenty of fans at a potluck. Medrich stirs nutty brown butter into the chocolate-walnut batter for deeper flavor. You'll wind up with 25 soft, velvety squares with slightly crusty tops.

Economical, super simple to make, impressive to look at and not to mention delicious, this chocolaty matzo-based confection will "magically disappear before your eyes," Gutman and King say. You can use any kind of matzo (salted or not) or even saltines, and can add toppings such as coconut, slivered almonds or chopped dried cherries.

Two characteristics distinguish a truly excellent lemon bar: a base layer that doesn't get soggy, and a filling that gives a little but is still quite firm. This foolproof recipe from entertaining and baking expert Amy Atlas hits both notes. To get razor-sharp cuts through the curd and crust, Atlas says, use a very sharp knife dipped in warm water. Rewet it every few cuts to maintain ultraprecise edges.

We predict that within approximately 23 seconds of placing a platter of sweet, rich homemade fudge in front of your guests, you'll start to hear it around the room: "There's homemade fudge?" and "She made homemade fudge?" This ginger-flecked version—which yields an impressive 64 pieces—will not disappoint the masses.


8 Big-Pan Desserts for Your Big, Hungry Crowd

Liz Gutman and Jen King, proprietors of the Brooklyn sweet shop Liddabit Sweets and authors of The Liddabit Sweets Candy Cookbook, say the active work time to make the filling for these squares—made of chocolate, Nutella and cereal flakes—is about three minutes. That makes them the perfect eleventh-hour lifeline for when you remember you need a dessert for tomorrow's potluck. Bonus: The recipe makes about 100 one-inch squares.

These decadent layered bars consist of a base made from oats, coconut and cashews a filling of softened, lemon-scented apricots and a topping of more coconuts and cashews. A final drizzle of caramel pretty much ensures these will be one of the first desserts on the buffet table to go.

Nothing delivers that signature whoosh of coolness like a chocolate-mint confection, and these meltaways have it in spades. Peppermint oil, which you can find in health food stores as a dietary supplement, or peppermint extract will both do the job. This easy recipe from Gutman and King gives you 65 one-inch squares.

Gutman and King say it's worth it to splurge on high-quality butter for this Heath bar–esque creation, since the dessert's center solely consists of butter, sugar and salt (the chopped walnuts and milk chocolate on the outside are just gravy). The recipe makes about 4 pounds, which is enough for 60 people.

While everyone has their preferred brownie (cakey, chewy, fudgy), this classic-with-a-twist recipe from baking guru Alice Medrich will find plenty of fans at a potluck. Medrich stirs nutty brown butter into the chocolate-walnut batter for deeper flavor. You'll wind up with 25 soft, velvety squares with slightly crusty tops.

Economical, super simple to make, impressive to look at and not to mention delicious, this chocolaty matzo-based confection will "magically disappear before your eyes," Gutman and King say. You can use any kind of matzo (salted or not) or even saltines, and can add toppings such as coconut, slivered almonds or chopped dried cherries.

Two characteristics distinguish a truly excellent lemon bar: a base layer that doesn't get soggy, and a filling that gives a little but is still quite firm. This foolproof recipe from entertaining and baking expert Amy Atlas hits both notes. To get razor-sharp cuts through the curd and crust, Atlas says, use a very sharp knife dipped in warm water. Rewet it every few cuts to maintain ultraprecise edges.

We predict that within approximately 23 seconds of placing a platter of sweet, rich homemade fudge in front of your guests, you'll start to hear it around the room: "There's homemade fudge?" and "She made homemade fudge?" This ginger-flecked version—which yields an impressive 64 pieces—will not disappoint the masses.


8 Big-Pan Desserts for Your Big, Hungry Crowd

Liz Gutman and Jen King, proprietors of the Brooklyn sweet shop Liddabit Sweets and authors of The Liddabit Sweets Candy Cookbook, say the active work time to make the filling for these squares—made of chocolate, Nutella and cereal flakes—is about three minutes. That makes them the perfect eleventh-hour lifeline for when you remember you need a dessert for tomorrow's potluck. Bonus: The recipe makes about 100 one-inch squares.

These decadent layered bars consist of a base made from oats, coconut and cashews a filling of softened, lemon-scented apricots and a topping of more coconuts and cashews. A final drizzle of caramel pretty much ensures these will be one of the first desserts on the buffet table to go.

Nothing delivers that signature whoosh of coolness like a chocolate-mint confection, and these meltaways have it in spades. Peppermint oil, which you can find in health food stores as a dietary supplement, or peppermint extract will both do the job. This easy recipe from Gutman and King gives you 65 one-inch squares.

Gutman and King say it's worth it to splurge on high-quality butter for this Heath bar–esque creation, since the dessert's center solely consists of butter, sugar and salt (the chopped walnuts and milk chocolate on the outside are just gravy). The recipe makes about 4 pounds, which is enough for 60 people.

While everyone has their preferred brownie (cakey, chewy, fudgy), this classic-with-a-twist recipe from baking guru Alice Medrich will find plenty of fans at a potluck. Medrich stirs nutty brown butter into the chocolate-walnut batter for deeper flavor. You'll wind up with 25 soft, velvety squares with slightly crusty tops.

Economical, super simple to make, impressive to look at and not to mention delicious, this chocolaty matzo-based confection will "magically disappear before your eyes," Gutman and King say. You can use any kind of matzo (salted or not) or even saltines, and can add toppings such as coconut, slivered almonds or chopped dried cherries.

Two characteristics distinguish a truly excellent lemon bar: a base layer that doesn't get soggy, and a filling that gives a little but is still quite firm. This foolproof recipe from entertaining and baking expert Amy Atlas hits both notes. To get razor-sharp cuts through the curd and crust, Atlas says, use a very sharp knife dipped in warm water. Rewet it every few cuts to maintain ultraprecise edges.

We predict that within approximately 23 seconds of placing a platter of sweet, rich homemade fudge in front of your guests, you'll start to hear it around the room: "There's homemade fudge?" and "She made homemade fudge?" This ginger-flecked version—which yields an impressive 64 pieces—will not disappoint the masses.


8 Big-Pan Desserts for Your Big, Hungry Crowd

Liz Gutman and Jen King, proprietors of the Brooklyn sweet shop Liddabit Sweets and authors of The Liddabit Sweets Candy Cookbook, say the active work time to make the filling for these squares—made of chocolate, Nutella and cereal flakes—is about three minutes. That makes them the perfect eleventh-hour lifeline for when you remember you need a dessert for tomorrow's potluck. Bonus: The recipe makes about 100 one-inch squares.

These decadent layered bars consist of a base made from oats, coconut and cashews a filling of softened, lemon-scented apricots and a topping of more coconuts and cashews. A final drizzle of caramel pretty much ensures these will be one of the first desserts on the buffet table to go.

Nothing delivers that signature whoosh of coolness like a chocolate-mint confection, and these meltaways have it in spades. Peppermint oil, which you can find in health food stores as a dietary supplement, or peppermint extract will both do the job. This easy recipe from Gutman and King gives you 65 one-inch squares.

Gutman and King say it's worth it to splurge on high-quality butter for this Heath bar–esque creation, since the dessert's center solely consists of butter, sugar and salt (the chopped walnuts and milk chocolate on the outside are just gravy). The recipe makes about 4 pounds, which is enough for 60 people.

While everyone has their preferred brownie (cakey, chewy, fudgy), this classic-with-a-twist recipe from baking guru Alice Medrich will find plenty of fans at a potluck. Medrich stirs nutty brown butter into the chocolate-walnut batter for deeper flavor. You'll wind up with 25 soft, velvety squares with slightly crusty tops.

Economical, super simple to make, impressive to look at and not to mention delicious, this chocolaty matzo-based confection will "magically disappear before your eyes," Gutman and King say. You can use any kind of matzo (salted or not) or even saltines, and can add toppings such as coconut, slivered almonds or chopped dried cherries.

Two characteristics distinguish a truly excellent lemon bar: a base layer that doesn't get soggy, and a filling that gives a little but is still quite firm. This foolproof recipe from entertaining and baking expert Amy Atlas hits both notes. To get razor-sharp cuts through the curd and crust, Atlas says, use a very sharp knife dipped in warm water. Rewet it every few cuts to maintain ultraprecise edges.

We predict that within approximately 23 seconds of placing a platter of sweet, rich homemade fudge in front of your guests, you'll start to hear it around the room: "There's homemade fudge?" and "She made homemade fudge?" This ginger-flecked version—which yields an impressive 64 pieces—will not disappoint the masses.


8 Big-Pan Desserts for Your Big, Hungry Crowd

Liz Gutman and Jen King, proprietors of the Brooklyn sweet shop Liddabit Sweets and authors of The Liddabit Sweets Candy Cookbook, say the active work time to make the filling for these squares—made of chocolate, Nutella and cereal flakes—is about three minutes. That makes them the perfect eleventh-hour lifeline for when you remember you need a dessert for tomorrow's potluck. Bonus: The recipe makes about 100 one-inch squares.

These decadent layered bars consist of a base made from oats, coconut and cashews a filling of softened, lemon-scented apricots and a topping of more coconuts and cashews. A final drizzle of caramel pretty much ensures these will be one of the first desserts on the buffet table to go.

Nothing delivers that signature whoosh of coolness like a chocolate-mint confection, and these meltaways have it in spades. Peppermint oil, which you can find in health food stores as a dietary supplement, or peppermint extract will both do the job. This easy recipe from Gutman and King gives you 65 one-inch squares.

Gutman and King say it's worth it to splurge on high-quality butter for this Heath bar–esque creation, since the dessert's center solely consists of butter, sugar and salt (the chopped walnuts and milk chocolate on the outside are just gravy). The recipe makes about 4 pounds, which is enough for 60 people.

While everyone has their preferred brownie (cakey, chewy, fudgy), this classic-with-a-twist recipe from baking guru Alice Medrich will find plenty of fans at a potluck. Medrich stirs nutty brown butter into the chocolate-walnut batter for deeper flavor. You'll wind up with 25 soft, velvety squares with slightly crusty tops.

Economical, super simple to make, impressive to look at and not to mention delicious, this chocolaty matzo-based confection will "magically disappear before your eyes," Gutman and King say. You can use any kind of matzo (salted or not) or even saltines, and can add toppings such as coconut, slivered almonds or chopped dried cherries.

Two characteristics distinguish a truly excellent lemon bar: a base layer that doesn't get soggy, and a filling that gives a little but is still quite firm. This foolproof recipe from entertaining and baking expert Amy Atlas hits both notes. To get razor-sharp cuts through the curd and crust, Atlas says, use a very sharp knife dipped in warm water. Rewet it every few cuts to maintain ultraprecise edges.

We predict that within approximately 23 seconds of placing a platter of sweet, rich homemade fudge in front of your guests, you'll start to hear it around the room: "There's homemade fudge?" and "She made homemade fudge?" This ginger-flecked version—which yields an impressive 64 pieces—will not disappoint the masses.


8 Big-Pan Desserts for Your Big, Hungry Crowd

Liz Gutman and Jen King, proprietors of the Brooklyn sweet shop Liddabit Sweets and authors of The Liddabit Sweets Candy Cookbook, say the active work time to make the filling for these squares—made of chocolate, Nutella and cereal flakes—is about three minutes. That makes them the perfect eleventh-hour lifeline for when you remember you need a dessert for tomorrow's potluck. Bonus: The recipe makes about 100 one-inch squares.

These decadent layered bars consist of a base made from oats, coconut and cashews a filling of softened, lemon-scented apricots and a topping of more coconuts and cashews. A final drizzle of caramel pretty much ensures these will be one of the first desserts on the buffet table to go.

Nothing delivers that signature whoosh of coolness like a chocolate-mint confection, and these meltaways have it in spades. Peppermint oil, which you can find in health food stores as a dietary supplement, or peppermint extract will both do the job. This easy recipe from Gutman and King gives you 65 one-inch squares.

Gutman and King say it's worth it to splurge on high-quality butter for this Heath bar–esque creation, since the dessert's center solely consists of butter, sugar and salt (the chopped walnuts and milk chocolate on the outside are just gravy). The recipe makes about 4 pounds, which is enough for 60 people.

While everyone has their preferred brownie (cakey, chewy, fudgy), this classic-with-a-twist recipe from baking guru Alice Medrich will find plenty of fans at a potluck. Medrich stirs nutty brown butter into the chocolate-walnut batter for deeper flavor. You'll wind up with 25 soft, velvety squares with slightly crusty tops.

Economical, super simple to make, impressive to look at and not to mention delicious, this chocolaty matzo-based confection will "magically disappear before your eyes," Gutman and King say. You can use any kind of matzo (salted or not) or even saltines, and can add toppings such as coconut, slivered almonds or chopped dried cherries.

Two characteristics distinguish a truly excellent lemon bar: a base layer that doesn't get soggy, and a filling that gives a little but is still quite firm. This foolproof recipe from entertaining and baking expert Amy Atlas hits both notes. To get razor-sharp cuts through the curd and crust, Atlas says, use a very sharp knife dipped in warm water. Rewet it every few cuts to maintain ultraprecise edges.

We predict that within approximately 23 seconds of placing a platter of sweet, rich homemade fudge in front of your guests, you'll start to hear it around the room: "There's homemade fudge?" and "She made homemade fudge?" This ginger-flecked version—which yields an impressive 64 pieces—will not disappoint the masses.


8 Big-Pan Desserts for Your Big, Hungry Crowd

Liz Gutman and Jen King, proprietors of the Brooklyn sweet shop Liddabit Sweets and authors of The Liddabit Sweets Candy Cookbook, say the active work time to make the filling for these squares—made of chocolate, Nutella and cereal flakes—is about three minutes. That makes them the perfect eleventh-hour lifeline for when you remember you need a dessert for tomorrow's potluck. Bonus: The recipe makes about 100 one-inch squares.

These decadent layered bars consist of a base made from oats, coconut and cashews a filling of softened, lemon-scented apricots and a topping of more coconuts and cashews. A final drizzle of caramel pretty much ensures these will be one of the first desserts on the buffet table to go.

Nothing delivers that signature whoosh of coolness like a chocolate-mint confection, and these meltaways have it in spades. Peppermint oil, which you can find in health food stores as a dietary supplement, or peppermint extract will both do the job. This easy recipe from Gutman and King gives you 65 one-inch squares.

Gutman and King say it's worth it to splurge on high-quality butter for this Heath bar–esque creation, since the dessert's center solely consists of butter, sugar and salt (the chopped walnuts and milk chocolate on the outside are just gravy). The recipe makes about 4 pounds, which is enough for 60 people.

While everyone has their preferred brownie (cakey, chewy, fudgy), this classic-with-a-twist recipe from baking guru Alice Medrich will find plenty of fans at a potluck. Medrich stirs nutty brown butter into the chocolate-walnut batter for deeper flavor. You'll wind up with 25 soft, velvety squares with slightly crusty tops.

Economical, super simple to make, impressive to look at and not to mention delicious, this chocolaty matzo-based confection will "magically disappear before your eyes," Gutman and King say. You can use any kind of matzo (salted or not) or even saltines, and can add toppings such as coconut, slivered almonds or chopped dried cherries.

Two characteristics distinguish a truly excellent lemon bar: a base layer that doesn't get soggy, and a filling that gives a little but is still quite firm. This foolproof recipe from entertaining and baking expert Amy Atlas hits both notes. To get razor-sharp cuts through the curd and crust, Atlas says, use a very sharp knife dipped in warm water. Rewet it every few cuts to maintain ultraprecise edges.

We predict that within approximately 23 seconds of placing a platter of sweet, rich homemade fudge in front of your guests, you'll start to hear it around the room: "There's homemade fudge?" and "She made homemade fudge?" This ginger-flecked version—which yields an impressive 64 pieces—will not disappoint the masses.


8 Big-Pan Desserts for Your Big, Hungry Crowd

Liz Gutman and Jen King, proprietors of the Brooklyn sweet shop Liddabit Sweets and authors of The Liddabit Sweets Candy Cookbook, say the active work time to make the filling for these squares—made of chocolate, Nutella and cereal flakes—is about three minutes. That makes them the perfect eleventh-hour lifeline for when you remember you need a dessert for tomorrow's potluck. Bonus: The recipe makes about 100 one-inch squares.

These decadent layered bars consist of a base made from oats, coconut and cashews a filling of softened, lemon-scented apricots and a topping of more coconuts and cashews. A final drizzle of caramel pretty much ensures these will be one of the first desserts on the buffet table to go.

Nothing delivers that signature whoosh of coolness like a chocolate-mint confection, and these meltaways have it in spades. Peppermint oil, which you can find in health food stores as a dietary supplement, or peppermint extract will both do the job. This easy recipe from Gutman and King gives you 65 one-inch squares.

Gutman and King say it's worth it to splurge on high-quality butter for this Heath bar–esque creation, since the dessert's center solely consists of butter, sugar and salt (the chopped walnuts and milk chocolate on the outside are just gravy). The recipe makes about 4 pounds, which is enough for 60 people.

While everyone has their preferred brownie (cakey, chewy, fudgy), this classic-with-a-twist recipe from baking guru Alice Medrich will find plenty of fans at a potluck. Medrich stirs nutty brown butter into the chocolate-walnut batter for deeper flavor. You'll wind up with 25 soft, velvety squares with slightly crusty tops.

Economical, super simple to make, impressive to look at and not to mention delicious, this chocolaty matzo-based confection will "magically disappear before your eyes," Gutman and King say. You can use any kind of matzo (salted or not) or even saltines, and can add toppings such as coconut, slivered almonds or chopped dried cherries.

Two characteristics distinguish a truly excellent lemon bar: a base layer that doesn't get soggy, and a filling that gives a little but is still quite firm. This foolproof recipe from entertaining and baking expert Amy Atlas hits both notes. To get razor-sharp cuts through the curd and crust, Atlas says, use a very sharp knife dipped in warm water. Rewet it every few cuts to maintain ultraprecise edges.

We predict that within approximately 23 seconds of placing a platter of sweet, rich homemade fudge in front of your guests, you'll start to hear it around the room: "There's homemade fudge?" and "She made homemade fudge?" This ginger-flecked version—which yields an impressive 64 pieces—will not disappoint the masses.


8 Big-Pan Desserts for Your Big, Hungry Crowd

Liz Gutman and Jen King, proprietors of the Brooklyn sweet shop Liddabit Sweets and authors of The Liddabit Sweets Candy Cookbook, say the active work time to make the filling for these squares—made of chocolate, Nutella and cereal flakes—is about three minutes. That makes them the perfect eleventh-hour lifeline for when you remember you need a dessert for tomorrow's potluck. Bonus: The recipe makes about 100 one-inch squares.

These decadent layered bars consist of a base made from oats, coconut and cashews a filling of softened, lemon-scented apricots and a topping of more coconuts and cashews. A final drizzle of caramel pretty much ensures these will be one of the first desserts on the buffet table to go.

Nothing delivers that signature whoosh of coolness like a chocolate-mint confection, and these meltaways have it in spades. Peppermint oil, which you can find in health food stores as a dietary supplement, or peppermint extract will both do the job. This easy recipe from Gutman and King gives you 65 one-inch squares.

Gutman and King say it's worth it to splurge on high-quality butter for this Heath bar–esque creation, since the dessert's center solely consists of butter, sugar and salt (the chopped walnuts and milk chocolate on the outside are just gravy). The recipe makes about 4 pounds, which is enough for 60 people.

While everyone has their preferred brownie (cakey, chewy, fudgy), this classic-with-a-twist recipe from baking guru Alice Medrich will find plenty of fans at a potluck. Medrich stirs nutty brown butter into the chocolate-walnut batter for deeper flavor. You'll wind up with 25 soft, velvety squares with slightly crusty tops.

Economical, super simple to make, impressive to look at and not to mention delicious, this chocolaty matzo-based confection will "magically disappear before your eyes," Gutman and King say. You can use any kind of matzo (salted or not) or even saltines, and can add toppings such as coconut, slivered almonds or chopped dried cherries.

Two characteristics distinguish a truly excellent lemon bar: a base layer that doesn't get soggy, and a filling that gives a little but is still quite firm. This foolproof recipe from entertaining and baking expert Amy Atlas hits both notes. To get razor-sharp cuts through the curd and crust, Atlas says, use a very sharp knife dipped in warm water. Rewet it every few cuts to maintain ultraprecise edges.

We predict that within approximately 23 seconds of placing a platter of sweet, rich homemade fudge in front of your guests, you'll start to hear it around the room: "There's homemade fudge?" and "She made homemade fudge?" This ginger-flecked version—which yields an impressive 64 pieces—will not disappoint the masses.